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Reviewing the Free Crackle TV Service

Unlike many other services, Crackle is entirely free once you download the Crackle app

Ugh! It was my least favorite day of the month — my cable television bill had just arrived in the mail. Even though I supposedly had a $69.99 per month cable bundle that covered EVERYTHING, for the fifth month in a row my bill was pushing the dreaded $150 mark with a long line of mystery fees and taxes. And then MORE taxes — I never knew how many different taxes there really were in this country until I subscribed to cable television for the first time.

My Bills Were Simply Unaffordable

The realization finally hit me. I simply could not afford these bills any longer. With rent, a huge student loan bill, a car payment, and now the giant cable bill, my monthly budget was buckling under the strain. If I were to be completely honest, it had already broke. Something simply had to give — and there was no way for me to stop paying my rent or my student loan bills. These were simply necessities. The rational, grown-up me understood that it was going to have to be my pricey cable television subscription that went. But, at the same time, I could not imagine cutting my cable cord and living without some of my favorite programs. I have to reluctantly admit that I am a television junkie — it is my favorite way to unwind at the end of a long and stressful workday.

There Had to Be a Solution

What was I going to do?

I had heard stories from some of my friends who had devices like Apple TV, and some of them were really pleased with their experiences. But, none of the available options on the market seemed like they perfectly fit my unique needs… except a Roku.

So once I got my Roku set-up, I started downloading channel after channel; Netflix, Amazon, and FandangoNOW, were just a few of the channels I downloaded in the beginning. That was until I heard about Crackle from a friend of mine who raved about the show, Chosen, that could be found on the app. His enthusiasm was infectious and I decided to check it out.

What Sets Crackle Apart

Unlike many other services that charge for you to access their streaming content, Crackle is entirely free once you download the Crackle app. And what word is more appealing to a recent college graduate than FREE? None that I can think of off the top of my head.

My first thought was an enthusiastic YES — sign me up right now. But, then, I admit, I started to get cold feet. What if it was harder to use Crackle than I had thought it would be? What if the video quality was poor or I ran into challenges with buffering? I did not want to get stuck with a service that had a ton of technical glitches. But, luckily, in the years that I have been a dedicated Crackle fan and user, I have not encountered a single hiccup — downloading content onto my devices has been smooth and hassle free and the Crackle website also offers suggestions if you were to run into any challenges. And from my conversations with my friends who also use Crackle, they report the same positive experiences.

The Pluses of Crackle

Once I had put my technical fears to rest, I only had one more concern — would there be enough content available to keep me interested and engaged? I quickly found out that the answer to this question was another resounding YES!

Crackle lets viewer’s watch more than 40 different television series across genres. And, if that still wasn’t enough to keep me interested, Crackle also offers Crackle original content and a huge library of movies. And the site is great about regularly rotating content so that there is always something new for you to watch.

One last great thing about Crackle is how easy it is to use the service’s mobile app to search for available content by genre and other key search terms — Crackle takes all of the guesswork out of the process.

And the Admittedly Small Negatives

The only downside that I have experienced with Crackle is that unlike with some of the for-pay services, you do no need to sit through commercials — that is how Crackle makes money to operate. And, like most people, I am not a huge fan of commercials (with the possible exception of Super Bowl commercials). But, on the plus side, the Crackle commercials are generally short. During a 30-minute sitcom, I usually only have to sit through three commercials, and this seems like a small price to pay for all of this great, free content.

Crackle: The Ideal Answer for All My Viewing Needs

Given all of these positives — free-of-charge, a great range of content that is regularly updated, and ease of use — there is not a single moment that I regret cutting my cable cord and downloading Crackle as one of the channel options for my Roku. I am happy and my wallet is undoubtedly even happier. And, not only am I a devoted Crackle fan, I tell all my friends that they should take the plunge.

 Tagged: tv show roku crackle tv streaming

Article Author
Jessica Thomas
NoCable.org Contributor

Jessica is a Freelance Writer and a Business Owner of a Personal + Virtual Assistant company based in Metro Detroit, Michigan. She has been freelance writing since 2013, where she mostly covered topics in the healthcare field. However, since 2015 when Jessica founded her business, she decided to switch it up and begin writing about topics outside of just the healthcare realm. You will find her writing about everything from workplace safety to how to become a virtual assistant.

Jessica obtained her undergraduate degree in Health Administration with a minor in Gerontology (Aging Studies) at Eastern Michigan University. She also completed her Master of Public Health degree with a concentration in Public Health Informatics from Michigan State University. She is a Spartan!

In Jessica's free time, she enjoys reading, traveling, trying new restaurants, shopping, and being around family & friends.

To connect with Jessica, press that 'connect' button on LinkedIn or send her an email at jessicat@imperativeconcierge.com.

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